NURS FPX 6105 Assessment 4 Assessment Strategies and Complete Course Plan

NURS FPX 6105 Assessment 4 Assessment Strategies and Complete Course Plan

NURS FPX 6105 Assessment 4 Assessment Strategies and Complete Course Plan

Palliative Care Assessment Plan

Nursing palliative care is a specialist course that teaches nurses the information and skills needed to care for patients with life-threatening diseases. The course is primarily designed for registered nurses who want to work in palliative care or who are already working in a healthcare environment that provides end-of-life care. Pain treatment, symptom management, communication, ethical and legal concerns, loss and mourning, cultural factors, and spirituality are among the subjects covered in the course. Participants will learn how to assess patient requirements, create care plans, treat symptoms, and assist patients and their families as they approach the end of life.

The course is normally taught in a classroom format, although it may also be given online. The course incorporates hands-on practice and clinical experiences, in addition to didactic education, to offer learners real-world experience in providing palliative care. Participants who complete the course are eligible for palliative care nursing certification through professional organizations such as the Hospice and Palliative Credentialing Center (HPCC) or the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) (Black, 2022). Certification validates a nurse’s knowledge in palliative care and improves work possibilities and career progression (Black, 2022).

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This course is designed for final-year nursing students or nurses who have completed their basic program and wish to specialize in palliative care. The course is designed to meet the needs of students with varying learning styles and levels of expertise, and it employs a range of teaching strategies to achieve those objectives. The training will address the concepts of palliative care, symptom management, communication skills, ethical and legal obstacles, spiritual and cultural concerns, and grief and bereavement support. After completing the course, students will have a complete understanding of palliative care ideas and methods, as well as the skills and information necessary to provide holistic care to patients with life-threatening illnesses (Dahlin et al., 2018).

Palliative care is a clinical subspecialty that focuses on relieving the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual distress that often accompanies life-limiting illnesses. It is a type of therapy that aims to enhance the quality of life for patients and their families living with serious illnesses such as cancer, heart failure, dementia, and other chronic illnesses. A palliative care course at a university is designed to give nursing students a solid understanding of palliative care principles and practices. Palliative care entails symptom management, communication skills, ethical and legal problems, spiritual and cultural concerns, and grief and bereavement support (Black, 2022). The course also covers advanced topics such as end-of-life care, pain management, and the use of technology in palliative care.

Palliative care is important for students to understand since it focuses on controlling symptoms such as pain, nausea, and shortness of breath and offering emotional support, counseling, and aid with advanced care planning (Martins Pereira et al., 2021). It is frequently used in conjunction with medical therapies aimed at curing the underlying condition, such as radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or surgery. Palliative care is a comprehensive therapeutic method that can be given at any stage of a serious disease, not only at the end. Its purpose is to assist patients and their loved ones in living as comfortably and completely as possible while making informed decisions regarding their treatment. Palliative care is a patient-centered and holistic approach, focusing on the patient’s physical, emotional, and spiritual needs, as well as those of their family.

For a palliative care course to be effective, the learning environment should encourage student engagement and interaction, promote effective learning, and be aligned with the course objectives. With suitable seating arrangements and instructional materials, the classroom should be welcoming, roomy, and well-lit. Audiovisual equipment such as multimedia projectors, computer workstations, and whiteboards should be given to improve learning. Traditional methodologies such as lectures, debates, and case studies should be used in the teaching plan to engage different learning types, as stated by Davis et al. (2021). To encourage active learning and skill development, interactive and experiential learning methods such as role-playing, simulation exercises, and group work should be used.

Clinical practicums at hospices and palliative care units should be included in the course to offer students with practical experience in palliative care settings. Students will be able to apply classroom information to real-world circumstances, improving their capacity to care for patients with life-threatening conditions. Furthermore, the course should be organized to encourage collaborative learning and participation from all students (Bishop et al., 2019). Group work, case studies, and group presentations should promote peer learning and collaboration. Meanwhile, the learning environment should promote an open exchange of ideas and critical thinking while also encouraging a courteous and supportive environment. As the course instructor, it is critical to give students regular feedback and be ready to provide further guidance and support as required.

A palliative care course’s core audience is nursing students in their last year of study or nurses who have finished their basic training and want to specialize in palliative care. Other healthcare professionals involved in the care of patients with life-threatening diseases, such as physicians, social workers, chaplains, and therapists, may also benefit from the training. The course can be tailored to accommodate students with varied learning styles and levels of competence, catering to individuals with past experience in palliative care as well as those who are new to the profession (Bishop et al., 2019). This course is ideal for students who are empathetic and who are interested in caring for people with life-threatening illnesses. Also, students with good communication skills and experience working in interdisciplinary teams will benefit immensely from this course. Students should leave the course with a thorough grasp of the concepts and practices of palliative care and the abilities needed to give compassionate care to patients and their families during end-of-life care.

The constructivism learning theory may be applied effectively in the development of a palliative care course to promote active and collaborative learning among nursing students while also improving their knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for nursing practice, according to Pereira et al. (2021). Students are encouraged to construct their own knowledge via reflection, inquiry, and cooperation under this method, which stresses student-centered learning. In a constructivist learning environment, nursing students are encouraged to participate in active learning activities such as problem-solving, case-based learning, and simulations. This develops critical thinking, clinical reasoning, and problem-solving abilities, which are vital for delivering compassionate care to patients with life-limiting diseases. The incorporation of constructivism into nursing education also promotes lifelong learning and professional development, both of which are necessary for practicing nursing in today’s quickly changing healthcare system. The constructivism approach is particularly beneficial in addressing the complex and diverse nature of palliative care, including the physical, emotional, and spiritual components of patient care. Further, it allows students to form their own knowledge of the subject matter. Therefore, the constructivism learning theory provides an excellent framework for creating a palliative care course that promotes active learning, teamwork, and the development of essential skills required for compassionate patient care.

A combination of classroom and clinical settings is required to create an effective learning environment for a palliative care course for nursing students. Through diverse teaching tactics such as lectures, group discussions, case studies, and interactive simulations, the classroom should be tailored to foster active learning, according to Creditt and Sing (2021). The learning environment should be inclusive, with accessible resources, varied and inclusive models, and a supportive environment that celebrates the different contributions of all learners. Furthermore, the clinical setting allows nursing students to apply their knowledge and skills in a real-world scenario. This practical experience helps students to hone the interpersonal and communication skills needed to provide compassionate and thorough care to patients and their families. As a result, for nursing students to become successful and compassionate palliative care practitioners, a balanced approach integrating theoretical and practical knowledge, active learning, and cooperation is critical.

Culture may have an impact on learning through influencing learners’ communication skills, learning preferences, and worldviews. Some cultures, for example, may prioritize collectivism and collaboration, whilst others may prioritize individualism and competitiveness. This can potentially affect how students approach group assignments and problem-solving activities. Nurse educators may accommodate many cultural perspectives by creating a learning environment that acknowledges and respects different points of view while still providing opportunities for collaborative and individual learning.

Multiculturalism is vital in fostering diversity in nursing education. Teachers must acknowledge and value their students’ different cultural backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences. Teachers can utilize culturally sensitive teaching strategies appropriate for diverse student groups to promote an inclusive learning environment. Case studies or role-playing exercises that mirror the experiences and attitudes of diverse patient populations might be one way. Furthermore, teachers should encourage students to share their personal experiences and perspectives on palliative care, which can build cultural competency and increase awareness of varied patient groups(Black, 2022). Students in a palliative care course can range from regular undergraduates to nontraditional adult learners. To accommodate students of all ages, educators should create a learning environment that is sensitive to their various needs. One strategy may be to use technology, such as online learning platforms or virtual simulations, to allow students to access course materials and participate in class discussions at their own speed. Instructors can also utilize instructional strategies such as small group discussions to accommodate the learning styles and preferences of different age groups. Gender equity and acknowledging the contributions of different ethnic groups are critical in creating an inclusive learning environment. Using gender-neutral vocabulary and incorporating varied opinions into class discussions and activities may help instructors create a welcoming environment. Allowing students to share their personal experiences and perspectives on palliative care helps promote cultural competency and understanding of different patient groups. Gender and personal experiences, for example, can impact learning.  Learners’ socialization experiences and expectations may be influenced by gender, prompting some students to prefer working in same-gender groups while others prefer mixed-gender groups. Nurse educators must try to provide a friendly and inclusive learning environment that promotes gender awareness and equality in order to address this. Moreover, earlier experiences might influence learning by altering pre-existing information and talents. Learners who have personal experience in palliative care may have a better knowledge of the course content and be able to contribute significant insights to their peers.

Socioeconomic position can also influence the learning environment in a palliative care course. Low-income students may have difficulty acquiring course materials or engaging in class discussions. To address this, instructors may provide all children with accessible and inexpensive materials and support services. This might include access to free or low-cost textbooks or digital resources (Black, 2022). Teachers may also develop an inclusive and courteous climate in the classroom, which contributes to the creation of a helpful learning environment for all learners.

In a palliative care course, limited English proficiency might be a significant cultural barrier that influences the learning environment. Students who do not speak English fluently may have difficulty understanding course content or participating in class discussions. To address this, teachers can give materials and support services tailored to non-native English speakers’ needs. Bilingual course materials or language support services might be included. Instructors may also build an inclusive and courteous climate in the classroom, which contributes to the creation of a helpful learning environment for students from varied linguistic backgrounds.

Conflict management is critical to building a supportive and inclusive learning environment adapted to the requirements of a varied group of palliative care students. Cultural differences, personal views, and communication styles can all lead to classroom conflicts (Devery et al., 2022). To effectively manage conflict in a palliative care course, a proactive approach that tackles possible sources of conflict and fosters open dialogue and understanding among all learners is required.

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One technique for managing classroom disagreement is establishing clear expectations and ground rules for courteous speech and behavior. This might include creating active listening standards, avoiding personal assaults or prejudices, and recognizing differences in cultural origins and personal experiences. Teachers may create a supportive learning atmosphere that encourages open discourse and mutual respect among all students by establishing clear communication and behavior requirements. Allowing students to participate in open and courteous dialogues can help with conflict resolution. This might include employing small group conversations or class-wide debates to encourage students to share their thoughts and interact meaningfully with their peers. Instructors can also encourage open communication among students by actively listening to them and encouraging them to communicate their opinions and experiences in a nonjudgmental and respectful manner. Instructors can take a proactive approach to resolve possible sources of conflict in the classroom by including diversity and inclusion in course material and activities. This might be utilizing case studies or real-life examples to illustrate the experiences and perspectives of other patient groups or incorporating cultural diversity into class discussions and activities (Mallette et al., 2021).

Similarly, instructors may develop understanding and empathy among students by including diversity and inclusion in course content, which can assist in avoiding possible sources of conflict in the first place. Whenever conflict arises in the classroom, instructors might employ a problem-solving strategy that encourages open communication and mutual understanding. This may entail fostering communication among the students engaged in the disagreement and collaborating with them to uncover the root causes of the problem and provide mutually acceptable solutions (Mallette et al., 2021). Instructors can also give students with tools and support services such as counseling or mediation if they need help settling problems.

Positive reinforcement is used to encourage good behaviors and negative reinforcement is used to discourage undesirable actions in behavior modification, according to behaviorism theory (Scherrens et al., 2023). Nevertheless, in the context of a palliative care course, this strategy may not be the most successful way because learners are often motivated to learn about palliative care because they want to help patients and families cope with difficult conditions.

On the other hand, humanism emphasizes the significance of self-actualization and personal growth. Teachers are urged to provide a welcoming and inclusive learning atmosphere that values each student’s needs, interests, and abilities (Humaira Biruny & Salsabila, 2021). This theory is more appropriate in the context of a palliative care course, when learners are motivated by a desire to develop their communication, empathy, and problem-solving skills, as well as provide compassionate and comprehensive care to patients and their families. Active learning, collaboration, and experiential learning can assist learners to stay interested and involved to increase learner management and motivation. Including diverse examples, as well as learners’ experiences and perspectives, may also serve to foster a feeling of belonging and relevance in the classroom.

Active learning, inclusive teaching, and motivational interviewing are evidence-based teaching strategies that can improve nursing students’ learning experiences in a palliative care course, according to Rauch et al. (2023). Case studies, role-playing, simulations, and reflective writing are examples of active learning exercises that help increase critical thinking, problem-solving, communication skills, and course knowledge retention. Inclusive teaching that acknowledges and embraces variety and allows for sharing and learning from one another may foster a feeling of belonging, minimize stereotype danger, and increase engagement and motivation among diverse learners. Learner motivation and engagement may be improved through motivational interviewing, a communication strategy that assists learners in identifying their motivations and objectives. Using culturally sensitive teaching practices, individualized help and feedback, and varied and inclusive examples may all improve students’ learning experiences.

Improved communication skills are one of the course’s main aims since healthcare workers and caregivers must learn how to connect compassionately with patients and their families. This entails actively listening, offering emotional support, and addressing anxieties and fears. Improved symptom management abilities are another essential learning outcome, as patients in palliative care commonly have physical and psychological symptoms that require treatment. Palliative care courses teach students about numerous medications and therapies that help reduce pain and other symptoms, as well as how to manage complicated situations that require a multidisciplinary approach. In addition, a holistic approach to therapy is stressed, which includes addressing patients’ emotional, social, and spiritual needs, as well as grieving support, end-of-life rituals, and cultural considerations. The palliative care course also covers ethical and legal problems with patient care, such as medical ethical ideas and legal difficulties concerning end-of-life care. Healthcare professionals and caregivers must be aware of these considerations in order to offer ethical and legal care. Finally, the palliative care course highlights the value of interdisciplinary treatment and good teamwork among physicians, nurses, social workers, and other healthcare professionals.

The development of palliative care objectives and learning outcomes is founded on the notion that it is the obligation of healthcare professionals to provide compassionate, patient-centered care to patients suffering from terminal conditions. This needs specific training in order to deliver high-quality palliative care, which includes not just physical symptoms but also psychological, social, and spiritual needs. Palliative care education emphasizes patient-centered care, which includes listening to and respecting the preferences and beliefs of patients and families. Palliative care education can ensure that healthcare workers have the necessary skills and knowledge to provide competent and compassionate care to patients and families, ultimately improving the quality of life for those suffering from life-limiting diseases by assigning specific learning objectives and outcomes.

Choosing proper teaching strategies for learners in a palliative care course is critical for a nurse educator. Case-based learning, role-playing, and simulation are three excellent teaching strategies (Kirkpatrick et al., 2023). Case-based learning is providing learners with difficult patient scenarios to build a treatment plan, assisting them in understanding how the ideas learned are implemented in the real world. This method helps students to develop critical thinking and decision-making skills in a safe and supportive environment, which is especially beneficial for learners who enjoy hands-on learning and group projects.

Role-playing is a teaching approach in which students act out different roles to practice communication and decision-making skills. It is especially beneficial in teaching awkward talks with patients and relatives about end-of-life care (Kirkpatrick et al., 2023). This method allows students to practice abilities in a realistic and relevant manner, increasing confidence when presented with comparable situations in real life.

Students practice skills in a realistic situation, which is especially beneficial in teaching how to handle complicated symptoms like pain and dyspnea. Students may practice skills in a controlled and safe setting, feeling better prepared to deal with these problems in the real world.

These palliative care teaching approaches are learner-centered and encourage active involvement, which improves content acquisition and retention. They may also be tailored to different learning styles and levels of expertise.

Evidence-based solutions for overcoming potential learning difficulties in the classroom include creating a good and supportive environment, customizing instruction, and employing formative evaluation. These tactics are based on the recognition that different learners have different needs and preferences and that effective teaching must address both internal and external variables that hamper learning.

Setting clear standards, using positive reinforcement, and connecting with students are all part of creating a happy and supportive classroom environment. This reduces anxiety and stress while providing a secure area for students to ask questions and participate in class. Differentiating teaching entails adapting instructional approaches and resources to meet the diverse needs of learners. This method acknowledges that students have varied learning styles, requirements, and preferences and that effective training must account for these differences. Formative evaluation provides continuous feedback to evaluate and adjust training based on student requirements (Qadir et al., 2020). This method entails using quizzes, polls, and other evaluation tools to identify areas where learners want further assistance or instruction.

Assessment plan

Assessment Template for Palliative Care Education

Course: Palliative Care for Nurses

Assessment Type: Multiple-choice questions, case studies, and reflective essays.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course, learners will be able to:

  1. Define palliative care and its principles.
  2. Explain the stages of bereavement and loss.
  3. Illustrate effective communication skills in delivering palliative care.
  4. Use symptom management knowledge in palliative care.
  5. Apply knowledge of ethical issues in palliative care.
  6. Acknowledge cultural differences and their influence on palliative care.
  7. Examine personal attitudes and beliefs in relation to palliative care.

Assessment plan:

  1. Learners’ understanding of palliative care concepts, symptom management, ethical problems, and cultural diversity will be assessed using multiple-choice questions. The multiple-choice questions will be used to assess students’ grasp of the course’s fundamental ideas and principles.
  2. Case studies will be utilized to test learners’ abilities to apply their palliative care knowledge in real-world scenarios. The case studies will be developed to imitate circumstances that nurses may experience in the course of their work.
  3. The ability of learners to evaluate their attitudes and beliefs in the context of palliative care will be assessed through reflective essays. The essays will be written to urge students to consider their values, beliefs, and prejudices and how these may affect their capacity to provide effective palliative care.

Evaluation of Learning Outcomes:

A grading rubric will be used to analyze learners’ performance on multiple-choice questions, case studies, and reflective essays to determine whether or not learning goals were met. The following criteria will be used to create the grading rubric:

  1. Topic knowledge and comprehension.
  2. Knowledge application in real-life settings.
  3. Critical thinking and problem-solving abilities are required.
  4. Communication abilities.
  5. Self-reflection and awareness.

  Cultural Competency and Diverse Learning Styles

Assessments:

The selected assessment types support cultural competence and varied learning styles in the following ways:

  1. To guarantee that cultural diversity is taken into account in palliative care, multiple-choice questions will be used. For example, questions will address the significance of cultural awareness, understanding, and respect in palliative care.
  2. Case studies will be created to accommodate various learning styles. The situations will be varied to appeal to visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners.
  3. Reflective essays will be written to promote self-awareness and critical reflection, both of which are necessary for cultural competency. The essays will allow students to express themselves in their own words and integrate personal experiences and views.

Summary

The palliative care assessment plan template contains a number of assessment styles that are suited for the content, setting, and learner group. Pre-assessment, formative assessment, and summative assessment are all part of the strategy. A knowledge questionnaire will be used for pre-assessment, which will assist identify learners’ existing knowledge and areas for development. Observation, modeling, and case studies will be used for formative evaluation. Clinical placement will include observation, while simulation and case study will take place in the classroom. These strategies will allow students to put their newly acquired information to use in a safe and regulated setting. As part of the summative assessment, a written test will be used to measure learners’ knowledge and understanding of the subject matter. To guarantee that the test includes all levels of learning, it will be created using Bloom’s taxonomy. The assessment plan template also describes how learning outcomes will be assessed and how assessments will verify that learners have learned as planned. Learning results will be evaluated by comparing learners’ performance before and after the course. Assessments will indicate that learners have learned as intended by aligning with and measuring the course learning goals. Additionally, the assessment plan template takes into account how various assessment methods foster cultural competency and appropriateness for learners with different learning styles. Case studies that reflect the variety of the patient group will be used to enhance cultural competency. Simulation and case studies, which give a hands-on approach to learning, and the written test, which caters to learners who prefer a more conventional approach to learning, are assessment modalities that accommodate learners with diverse learning styles. As a result, the assessment plan template accommodates the various requirements of learners and ensures that all learners have an equal opportunity to demonstrate their grasp of the subject matter.

References

Bishop, C. T., Mazanec, P., Bullington, J., Craven, H., Dunkerley, M., Pritchett, J., & Coyne, P. J. (2019). Online End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium Core Curriculum for staff nurses: An education strategy to improve clinical practice: An education strategy to improve clinical practice. Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing: JHPN: The Official Journal of the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association21(6), 531–539. https://doi.org/10.1097/NJH.0000000000000593

Black, B. (2022). Professional nursing – E-book: Concepts & challenges (10th ed.). Elsevier.

Creditt, A. B., & Sing, K. (2021). Curriculum Development. In Oncologic Emergency Medicine (pp. 903–914). Springer International Publishing.

Dahlin, C., Coyne, P., Goldberg, J., & Vaughan, L. (2018). Palliative care leadership. Journal of Palliative Care34(1), 825859718791427. https://doi.org/10.1177/0825859718791427

Davis, A., Lippe, M., Glover, T. L., McLeskey, N., Shillam, C., & Mazanec, P. (2021). Integrating the ELNEC undergraduate curriculum into Nursing Education: Lessons learned. Journal of Professional Nursing: Official Journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing37(2), 286–290. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.profnurs.2020.12.003

Devery, K., Winsall, M., & Rawlings, D. (2022). Teams and continuity of end-of-life care in hospitals: managing differences of opinion. BMJ Open Quality11(2), e001724. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjoq-2021-001724

Humaira Biruny, D., & Salsabila, I. (2021). Application of a humanistic approach to health care and education. AMCA Journal of Community Development1(1), 9–12. https://doi.org/10.51773/ajcd.v1i1.22

Kirkpatrick, A. J., Donesky, D., & Kitko, L. A. (2023). A systematic review of interprofessional palliative care education programs. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2023.01.022

Mallette, C., Young, O. J., Arnold, E. C., & Boggs, K. U. (2021). Arnold and boggs’s interpersonal relationships – E-book: Professional communication skills for Canadian nurses. Elsevier Health Sciences.

Martins Pereira, S., Hernández-Marrero, P., Pasman, H. R., Capelas, M. L., Larkin, P., & Francke, A. L. (2021). Nursing education on palliative care across Europe: Results and recommendations from the EAPC Taskforce on preparation for practice in palliative care nursing across the EU based on an online-survey and country reports. Palliative Medicine35(1), 130–141. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269216320956817

Pereira, J., Giddings, G., Sauls, R., Harle, I., Antifeau, E., & Faulkner, J. (2021). Navigating design options for large-scale interprofessional continuing Palliative Care education: Pallium Canada’s experience. Palliative Medicine Reports2(1), 226–236. https://doi.org/10.1089/pmr.2021.0023

Qadir, J., Taha, A.-E., Yau, K.-L. A., Ponciano, J., Hussain, S., Al-Fuqaha, A., & Imran, M. (2020). Leveraging the force of formative assessment and feedback for effective engineering education. 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access Proceedings.

Rauch, L., Dudley, N., Adelman, T., & Canham, D. (2023). Palliative care education and serious illness communication training for baccalaureate nursing students. Nurse Educator, 10.1097/NNE.0000000000001368. https://doi.org/10.1097/NNE.0000000000001368

Scherrens, A.-L., Deforche, B., Deliens, L., Cohen, J., & Beernaert, K. (2023). Using behavioral theories to study health-promoting behaviors in palliative care research. Palliative Medicine, 2692163221147946. https://doi.org/10.1177/02692163221147946

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Assessment 4 Instructions: Assessment Strategies and Complete Course Plan
• PRINT
• Create a 12-15 page complete teaching plan, synthesizing previous work with an assessment plan for the course to create a cohesive whole.
Introduction
Assessment is a key to teaching and learning. In this assessment, you will select meaningful ways to assess the teaching and learning in the course you have been designing, and will tie together each of the parts of your course design.
Note: Assessments in this course build on each other and must be completed in sequential order.
For this assessment, you will build an assessment plan of your own that fits with your course plan. Your assessment plan should blend seamlessly into the course components that you have already designed. To that end, you will consolidate the work you have already completed in earlier assessments with the assessment plan here in order to create a clear, concise, focused teaching plan that meets the needs of the content, learner population, and environment.
Preparation
Take time to reflect on the following questions as you craft your assessment plan for your course, conducting additional research as necessary.
What types of assessment do you believe are most appropriate for your educational topic and intended audience?
• How will you evaluate whether or not learning outcomes were accomplished?
• Do the assessments you selected support cultural competence?
• How will the assessments demonstrate that learning has occurred?
• As you select the assessments that you will use, what is your rationale for the type of assessments you will use? Explain how these assessments support differences in learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic)?
Also, before completing your final, complete course plan, be sure to make any necessary changes or improvements based on what you have learned over the course overall.
(Optional) Practice implementing these considerations in the Vila Health challenge provided in the Resources before beginning your work here.
As you prepare to complete this assessment, you may want to think about other related issues to deepen your understanding or broaden your viewpoint. You are encouraged to consider the questions below and discuss them with a fellow learner, a work associate, an interested friend, or a member of your professional community.
Note that these questions are for your own development and exploration and do not need to be completed or submitted as part of your assessment.
• What criteria would you use to evaluate computer-assisted instruction (CAI) tools?
• How can social media be used to facilitate the educational process? What are some of the potential limits or pitfalls of its use?
• If you are currently a nurse educator, do you routinely conduct course assessments? If so, is that assessment data used for classroom or course improvement?
• How will you as a nurse-educator stay up-to-date on important trends that impact your field?
Instructions
Create a complete teaching plan for your course that fuses together all previous course components and includes the addition of a detailed assessment plan.
Your complete teaching plan should provide:
• An overview of the course topic, environment, and learner population.
• An explanation of the learner outcomes for the course as well as the learning theory or theories that are the foundation of the course.
• An incorporation of evidence-based best practices to enhance learner motivation in your selected learning environment and format.
• An integration of appropriate teaching strategies, techniques, and learner outcomes for nursing and healthcare education for use in specific situations and populations and of evidence-based best practices for classroom and learner management.
• A consideration of barriers to learning when designing and developing educational programs and an integration of cultural competence in nursing and healthcare educational offerings.
• A logical, well-designed assessment plan that addresses these points:
o A selection of assessment types that are most appropriate for the content, environment, and learner population.
o An explanation of how you will evaluate whether or not learning outcomes were accomplished in the course, and how assessments will demonstrate that learners have learned as intended.
o An analysis of how your selected assessment types support cultural competence as well as fit for learners with varied learning styles.
Organize your plan as follows:
• Title page.
• Table of Contents.
• An overview of your course (topic, setting audience, and so on).
• Learning Theories and Diversity (Assessment 1).
• Teaching Strategies (Assessment 2).
• Management and Motivation (Assessment 3).
• Assessment Strategies (designed in this Assessment).
• Summary.
• References.
• Appendices.
Your completed plan should be clear and flow together well. It should show cohesion, understanding, and the application of best practices, and all writing should be professional and free of errors.
Additional Requirements
• Format: 12-point Times New Roman or Arial font, double-spaced in Microsoft Word.
• Length: 12–15 pages, plus a title page and a references page.
• Use correct APA format, including running head, page numbers, and a title page.
• Use and cite at least 10 references, and at least five of them from peer-reviewed journals that are not required for this course.
• Writing should be free of grammar and spelling errors that distract from content.
Competencies Measured
By successfully completing this assessment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the course competencies through the following assessment scoring guide criteria:
• Competency 1: Appraise the influence of learner’s culture, gender, and experiences on teaching and learning.
o Apply knowledge of methods of thinking, learning, and communicating to specific learning situations.
o Consider barriers to learning when designing and developing educational programs.
o Integrate cultural competence in nursing and healthcare educational offerings.
• Competency 2: Apply educational theory and evidence-based teaching practices when implementing teaching strategies.
o Apply appropriate theory to optimize the teaching experience and learner outcomes.
• Competency 3: Apply a variety of teaching strategies appropriate to diverse learner needs, content, and desired learner outcomes.
o Incorporate evidence-based best practices to enhance learner motivation in a selected learning environment and format.
o Integrate appropriate teaching strategies, techniques, and outcomes for nursing and healthcare education for use in specific situations and populations.
o Design appropriate and meaningful assessments for a course.
• Competency 4: Integrate best practices for classroom management.
o Integrate evidence-based best practices for classroom and learner management.
• Competency 5: Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with the expectations of a nursing education professional.
o Develop a teaching plan for a selected topic that demonstrates flow, cohesion, and application of best practices.
o Support identified position with effective written communication using appropriate spelling, grammar, punctuation and mechanics, and APA style and formatting.

Assessment Strategies and Complete Course Plan Scoring Guide

CRITERIA NON-PERFORMANCE BASIC PROFICIENT DISTINGUISHED
Apply appropriate theory to optimize the teaching experience and learner outcomes. Does not apply theory to optimize the teaching experience and learner outcomes. Applies inappropriate theory to a teaching experience and learner outcomes. Applies appropriate theory to optimize the teaching experience and learner outcomes. Applies appropriate theory to optimize the teaching experience and learner outcomes; provides academic rationale for why and how theory is applied.
Apply knowledge of methods of thinking, learning, and communicating to specific learning situations. Does not apply knowledge of methods of thinking, learning, and communicating to specific learning situations. Inaccurately applies knowledge of methods of thinking, learning, and communicating to specific learning situations. Applies knowledge of methods of thinking, learning, and communicating to specific learning situations. Applies knowledge of methods of thinking, learning, and communicating to specific learning situations; references evidence-based research as the rationale for application.
Integrate appropriate teaching strategies, techniques, and outcomes for nursing and healthcare education for use in specific situations and populations. Does not integrate learning strategies, techniques, and outcomes for nursing and healthcare education for use in specific situations and populations. Integrates inappropriate learning strategies, techniques, and outcomes for nursing and healthcare education for use in specific situations and populations. Integrates appropriate teaching strategies, techniques, and outcomes for nursing and healthcare education for use in specific situations and populations. Integrates appropriate learning strategies, techniques, and outcomes for nursing and healthcare education for use in specific situations and populations; identifies assumptions upon which the choices are based.
Incorporate evidence-based best practices to enhance learner motivation in a selected learning environment and format. Does not integrate evidence based best practices for classroom and learner management. Integrates inappropriate practices for classroom and learner management. Integrates evidence-based best practices for classroom and learner management. Integrates evidence-based best practices for classroom and learner management; considers conflicting data and other perspectives.
Consider barriers to learning when designing and developing educational programs. Does not consider barriers to learning when designing and developing educational programs. Considers inapplicable barriers to learning and/or misses applicable barriers for consideration when designing and developing educational programs. Considers barriers to learning when designing and developing educational programs. Considers barriers to learning when designing and developing educational programs; identifies areas of uncertainty, knowledge gaps, and/or additional information that would be needed in order to gain a more complete understanding.
Integrate cultural competence in nursing and healthcare educational offerings. Does not integrate cultural competence in nursing and healthcare educational offerings. Inappropriately attempts to integrate cultural competence in nursing and healthcare educational offerings. Integrates cultural competence in nursing and healthcare educational offerings. Integrates cultural competence in nursing and healthcare educational offerings; evaluates the relevance, currency, sufficiency, and trustworthiness of the evidence for these choices.
Develop a teaching plan for a selected topic that demonstrates flow, cohesion, and application of best practices. Does not develop a teaching plan for a selected topic. Develops a teaching plan for a selected topic that fails to demonstrate flow, cohesion, or application of best practices. Develops a teaching plan for a selected topic that demonstrates flow, cohesion, and application of best practices. Develops a teaching plan for a selected topic that demonstrates flow, cohesion, and application of best practices across the entirety of the document.
Design appropriate and meaningful assessments for a course. Does not design appropriate and meaningful assessments for a course. Designs assessments for a course; assessments are not most appropriate fit for learning outcomes, content, population, or environment. Designs appropriate and meaningful assessments for a course. Designs appropriate and meaningful assessments for a course; assessments reflect application of best practice for the content, population, and environment of the course.
Support identified position with effective written communication using appropriate spelling, grammar, punctuation and mechanics, and APA style and formatting. Does not support identified position with effective written communication using appropriate spelling, grammar, punctuation, mechanics, and APA style and formatting. Supports the identified position with ineffective written communication using inappropriate spelling, grammar, punctuation, mechanics, and APA style and formatting. Supports identified position with effective written communication using appropriate spelling, grammar, punctuation and mechanics, and APA style and formatting. Supports the identified position with error-free written communication using pristine spelling, grammar, punctuation, mechanics, and APA style and formatting.

 

 

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